Home Strength Squat Rack vs Power Rack | Which One Is Better?

Squat Rack vs Power Rack | Which One Is Better?

by Tihomir Stefanov

In this article, you’re going to learn about the difference between squat racks and power racks, which one is better, and why.

Click here to jump to the answer

You’re also going to learn:

Are you ready to understand everything you need to know about squat racks and power racks?

Without further ado, let’s jump into it.

Key Summary: What Is The Difference Between A Squat Rack And A Power Rack

A question mark chalked onto a whiteboard representing the verdict between squat rack vs power rack

Confused? I can understand…

If you’ve been going to the gym for a while, you’ll have some understanding of what both are. But…

If you’re a newbie, you may see them as the same thing.

A few big metal things…

Here’s what you need to know:

  • The squat rack is basically two steel stands with one or more pins which can be attached to one another or completely separate
  • You use a squat rack to rack and un-rack your barbell when performing exercises such as the bench press, squat, overhead press (and many more we’ve covered below)
  • The power rack essentially does the same thing – it holds your barbell but it is significantly more sturdy (which is important if you’re lifting heavy)
  • You can also do more exercises using a power rack

In the following sections, I’m going you through (step by step) what each rack means.


Remaining chapters (with jump links):


What Is A Squat Rack Exactly?

Two people adding plates to a barbell which is resting on a squat rack

A squat rack (also known as a half-rack) is pretty much the smaller version of a full-on power rack.

The squat rack has a stable base at the bottom, from which two metal bars extend up.

Some squat racks connect the vertical bars for extra stability while others don’t.

A squat rack provides support when you reach failure on an exercise.

Have you reached failure during your strength training?

Muscular failure is the point during an exercise, where you can’t complete another repetition.

We think that we can do another rep, until we realise we’ve just made a big mistake.

In the next few seconds, things become ugly…

We start to panic and we can’t push the weight which leads us to do the “roll of shame”.

Why am I telling you this?

Because if you’re training from home – there is a good chance you’ll be on your own.

This is where a squat rack can be your best friend.

With its safety pins (also called safety arms) the half-rack provides perfect safety during a variety of exercises, such as when you’re doing a bench press:

[insert a new image of a guy doing bench press with a safety bar]

Doing an exercise and can’t do another rep?

No problem, you can just leave the bar safely on the pins and walk away.

This is one of the biggest reasons people use racks.

But there are also a lot of great exercises you can do:

Squat Rack Exercises

A strong man doing the bench press using a squat rack

You’re about to see the most common (and best) exercises you can do with a squat rack.

And if you scroll down slightly further, I’ve even put together a squat rack workout (which I use with my clients).

The most common (and best) squat rack exercises you can do with your barbell include:

  • Barbell bench press
  • Squats
  • Partial squats
  • Overhead press
  • Barbell reverse lunge
  • Barbell hip thrusts
  • Barbell bicep curls
  • Barbell Rows
  • Deadlifts

Pros and Cons Of A Squat Rack

pros and cons of a squat rack

The advantages of the squat rack are:

  1. It is much cheaper in comparison to the power rack (compare prices on Amazon)
  2. Perfect to use at home if you are limited on space
  3. Easier to move around

However, there are also disadvantages that can break the deal for you:

  1. You can’t lift as heavy – (many squat racks feel unsteady after more than 100kg)
  2. More limited in exercises (You’re not able to do pull ups/chin ups like you can with the power rack – although – a pull up bar is very inexpensive)
  3. Safety pins are not as long

Summary: A squat rack is a piece of gym equipment where two vertical posts made from steel help support a trainee with his or her compound exercises.


Remaining chapters (with jump links):


What Is A Power Rack?

power rack in red colour, with a fully loaded barbell

Before we conclude the squat rack vs power rack comparison, let’s see what the latter has to offer.

Power racks (also referred to as ‘full-racks’) have slightly different features in comparison to a squat rack.

Firstly, instead of having two steel bars like the squat rack, the power rack is essentially a rectangular cage.

It is most commonly purchased by commercial gyms and people who are into weight lifting due to their additional safety.

The cage is made up of a good, solid base which has four, thick metal bars which typically rise up 6ft 8 inches tall.

The metal bars are connected at the top for maximum stability.

You will actually hear the term “Cage” or “Squat cage” in the gym, rather than a “power rack”.

That’s simply because the power rack is practically a cage (especially when you put on the safety bars/catchers on the sides).

Perhaps the inventor (Terry Todd) wanted to make you feel like an untamed beast to improve your performance.😊🦍

But it certainly does the job.

Power Rack Exercises

A blonde lady hanging from a rogue power rack

Though significantly bigger, the power rack usually offers only two more exercises you can do.

These are:

  • Pull up bar (for pull-ups and chin-ups)
  • And sometimes: Dip bars

If you get a power rack, you can say goodbye to your gym membership forever.

This is because with a barbell, a bench, and some plates, you can train your entire body.

For example, you can do:

  • Squats – entire lower body
  • Barbell lunges – entire lower body
  • Hanging leg raises – core
  • Barbell row – upper and lower back
  • Barbell curls – biceps
  • Bench press – chest, shoulders, triceps
  • Pull-ups – lats, upper back, biceps
  • Chin-ups – lats, biceps
  • Barbell overhead press – shoulders, upper back, chest
  • Lots more

Nevertheless, though highly functional, a power rack has its disadvantages as well.

Pros And Cons Of A Power Rack

pros and cons of a power rack

The power rack has some advantages in comparison to the half-rack.

These are:

  • Ability to load a heavier barbell due to greater stability
  • Offers a wider variety of exercises
  • The majority of power racks come with a pull up bar
  • You won’t need a spotter again thanks to the safety bar
  • They are made of thick steel which can last centuries for your kids

However, due to its bigger size, there are also certain disadvantages to the power rack:

  • The bigger it is – the harder it is to move around (especially if you bolt it into the ground)
  • Takes up more floor space and is usually over 6ft 5 inches meaning it may not fit in your home
  • A fully-loaded power rack might damage your floor overtime
  • Considerably more expensive (compare prices on Amazon)

Summary: The power rack is essentially a cage made from four metal bars which connect at the top and bottom for utmost stability during compound-based exercise such as the squat or overhead press.

Now let’s see which one is better for you, shall we?


Remaining chapters (with jump links):


Squat Rack vs Power Rack: Verdict

squat rack vs power rack graphic

Above, we’ve learnt what a squat rack and power rack are. But…

Which one is actually better?

The verdict is quite clear.

If budget, space, and availability do not bother you, the power rack is the winner!

This is because a power rack:

  • Has a higher capacity to load more weight
  • Is safer thanks to its stability
  • Comes with a pull-up bar and other features

Though more expensive, some of the best power racks can be found online here.

The choice between a squat rack or a power rack also depends if…

If you’re looking to keep fit at home during this time: Squat racks are best for you.

Why?

Because they are easy to move around and you can fit a squat rack in any room of your house.

Sure, you can’t lift as heavy, but you can certainly stay in good shape.

Find the best one you can online here. (Note: Stock is limited during this time).

If you’re a bodybuilder/weight-lifter: Power racks are best for you.

Why?

Because the majority of squat racks can’t hold more than 180kg.

And even over 100kg – I can feel mine shaking whenever I rack/unrack my barbell.

Find the best one you can online here. (Note: Stock is limited during this time).

If you’re a small/commercial gym: Power rack is best for you.

Why?

Safety and stability is essential for your customers because you won’t want accidents to happen.

Power racks can be £100-£400 more expensive than their counterparts but they will protect your customers and make your gym look and feel the part.

Find the best one you can online here.

Summary: The power-rack is the best in comparison to the squat-rack because it is more stable under a heavier load and can come with a variety of attachments (such as pull-up bar/dip station).


Remaining chapters (with jump links):


The Best Power Rack

Mirafit Power Rack Weight Lifting Cage & Pull Up Bar

Mirafit Power Rack Weight Lifting product which is sold on Amazon

The Mirafit Power Rack offers a great combination of affordability, versatility, and functionality.

What we particularly like about this power rack is the ability to strengthen a wide range of muscles from a single unit. In fact…

You can strengthen every one of your muscles using this power cage in the workout you’ll see later on in this article.

I use a power rack at the local gym and whenever I use it, I feel safe.

In a sense that I can lift a heavy weight without the fear of having to drop the barbell.

This power rack isn’t anything special – it’s just a thick piece of steel that does the job.

Now, you’ll find it to be really compact.

This is because it sticks to the floor to prevent movement which is commonly experienced with squat rack users.

It has over 21 levels which are very easy meaning it will be good for you no matter how tall you are.

The power rack is perfect for any commercial gym (or your garage) due to its dimensions:

  • Height – 210cm
  • Width – 111cm
  • Depth – 113cm

The solid steel frame is 50mm by 50mm and its net weight is 56kg. But…

It also has a max load of 250kg!

Meaning you can make a lot of gains. (Unless – of course – you are Eddie Hall who can squat 345kg for 7 reps which you can see here.)

The unit is self-assembly, but the instructions are easy enough to follow.

You’ll be up and exercising within an hour.

Although I haven’t bought this myself, the five-star reviews online show that it is easier to assemble with two people.

This is because some of the parts are heavy and need stabilising. Although…

This could be turned into a workout within itself.

Due to this time we are living in, this is currently out of stock. But there are a few good quality power racks left on Amazon right here:

Buy one now!

Summary: The Mirafit Power Rack would make a great addition to your home or commercial gym due to sturdy steel posts and additional accessories. Your muscles are going to thank you.

Should You Bolt A Power Rack To The Floor?

3 by 8 wedge screws that drill into squat racks

The short answer to this question is yes.

Bolting into a floor (especially concrete slabs) can seem both difficult and dangerous.

And it is, unless you have the right tools and know-how.

If you’re lifting over 140kg of weight, it is especially important because when you rack your barbell you walk into the steel bars horizontally, and then lower the weight vertically.

Now when this happens, you’re effectively pushing the power rack and the heavier the weight, the further you’ll move the rack until it is on the other side of your gym.

The solution to this problem is bolting the power rack into the ground to grant extra stability for your moderate to heavy lifting.

Which brings us to…


Remaining chapters (with jump links):


How To Bolt A Power Rack To The Floor

A toy man drilling into a tomato which represents the heading: how to bolt a power rack into the ground

There are a few ways to bolt a power rack to the floor.

But here I’m going to show you the most effective way.

A way which rogue fitness recommend – one of the largest distributors of power racks.

They’ve created a step by step video for you here:

Attaching A Power Rack To Your Floor

You will need:

Note: You can bolt a power rack directly to concrete or you can cut away a part of your rubber floor to access the floor below.

Step 1) Make a space where you’d like to bolt the power rack to the floor

Step 2) Use your power drill to drill a hole in the floor so that you create a deep hole

Step 3) Vacuum the dust out of the hole

Step 4) Line up the ⅜ inch concrete anchor so that it covers one of the holes

Step 5) Tighten the ⅜ inch concrete anchor using your impact gun

Step 6) Repeat this process for all of the other holes that come with your power rack

If you don’t want to drill holes into your floor, you can create a platform using a mixture of plywood and rubber.

This is explained in the video below:


Remaining chapters (with jump links):


The Best Squat Rack

Gymano Pro-Squat Stands

A side view of the 'Multifunctional Adjustable bracket Strength training' squat rack.
The Gymano Pro-Squat Adjustable Barbell Fitness Rack is without a doubt – expensive. However…

From my experience, I would always use it at the boxing gym when doing the exercises like the chest press and squat.

I would then walk over to the speed bag and hit it for one minute as my active rest period.

I’d recommend getting a squat rack because it isn’t as unstable as people make it out to be.

But then again, I was only lifting 50kg, so it could be a different story for someone like Eddie Hall – the strongest man in the world!

Anyway, let’s get back to the actual product, shall we?

The barbell height of this squat rack ranges between 87 and 157cm in height and the safety spotters can be adjusted between 46cm to 71cm.

This makes it a perfect rack for everyone.

The stands don’t include an overhead stabilisation bar which means any barbell you use (Standard Barbell/Olympic

Barbell/Safety Squat Barbell) can work perfectly with the squat rack.

You’ll also find out that the safety spotters feel reliably sturdy.

This is because the entire stands are made from a super-sturdy metal – steel; 1.5mm thick.

Suitable for up to 180kg, these mega-sturdy stands provide plenty of scope for the home gym.

But they also offer all the reliable robustness required for a small commercial gym.

When you’re looking to put together a gym for the home, you really need to consider safety, especially if you’re likely to be training alone.

Fortunately, these stands come with an anti-slip hard-wearing rubber mat that will prevent unnecessary movement between spots.

The base of each stand is 44cm in width and 51cm in depth.

It is also finished in an attractive hammertone finish that’ll make your gym look the part.

Each stand weighs around 10kg which is a suitable weight to provide excellent stability.

Although these stands are capable of holding up to 180kg in total weight.

Customers who bought and reviewed it online said the squat rack felt much more stable if you’re training at around 50kg and under.

If you’re working with anything significantly more substantial, we’d recommend spotting with a gym buddy or using a power rack.

Discover This Squat Rack On Amazon Now

Summary: The Gymano Pro-Squat Stands is an excellent squat rack thanks to its horizontally attached and sturdy steel metal posts that mean you can rack and spot yourself with ease.
Also note: When you order a squat rack, you will want to know how to bolt it to the ground.

We’ve got you covered here:
a


Remaining chapters (with jump links):


How To Bolt A Squat Rack To The Floor

a hammer drill ready to use

A squat rack (half-rack) is un-sturdy on its own especially when using heavier weights.

This means bolting a squat rack to the floor is a solution I recommend.

It is also very easy to do.

Let’s walk through how to bolt a squat rack to the floor step by step:

You will need:

Step 1) Very simply, drill a hole through one of the visible holes on the base of your squat rack

Step 2) Hoover the dust particles that are in and around the hole

Step 3) Line up your ⅜ inch concrete anchor so that it is inline with the hole vertically

Step 4) Using your impact gun – or hammer – tighten or knock the wedge into place

Step 5) Repeat these steps for the other holes that come with your squat rack


Remaining chapter: A complete full-body workout using your rack


Full Body Squat Rack & Power Rack Workout (Which You Can Do In Your Garage)

Equipment needed:

  • Squat Rack – discover online: here
  • Bench – discover online: here
  • Barbell – discover online: here
  • Weighted plates – discover online: here
  • Resistance band – discover online: here

Exercise overview:
Two workouts per week (workout A and workout B)
Workout A:

  • Dynamic warm up
  • Barbell squats (3 sets of 10-12 reps)
  • Barbell Hip Thrusts (3 sets of 10-12 reps)
  • Barbell Bench Press (3 sets of 10-12 reps)
  • Barbell Bicep Curl (3 sets of 10-12 reps)
  • One-arm high band row (4 sets – 2 on each arm – of 10-12 reps)
  • Banded face-pulls (2 sets of 10-12 reps)

Workout B:

  • Dynamic warm up
  • Deadlifts (3 sets of 6 reps)
  • Barbell reverse lunge (3 sets of 10-12 reps)
  • Barbell overhead press (3 sets of 10-12 reps)
  • Barbell row (3 sets of 10-12 reps)
  • Back widow (2 sets of 10-12 reps)
  • Banded face-pulls (2 sets of 10-12 reps)

Let’s jump into it.

Full Body Workout A

Dynamic Warm-Up Execution:

Text transcript:

  • Inchworms (perform 10 in a row)
  • 90/90 stretches (5 on each side)
  • Rolling crucifix (5 on each side)
  • Table twists (5 on each side)
  • Three-way lunge and reach (5 on each leg)
  • Hamstring pulses (5 on each leg)
  • Hamstring reaches (5 on each leg)
  • Can openers (10 on each side)
  • Shoulder circles (10 on each side)
  • Ankle breakers (5 on each side)

Barbell Back Squats

Sets/reps: 3 sets of 10-12 reps
Rest time: 60 seconds
Barbell Back Squat Execution:
Step 1) Place your barbell at shoulder height
Step 2) Get under the bar so that it rests on your shoulders
Step 3) Stand parallel with your knees slightly bent
Step 4) Unrack the bar and take a few steps back
Step 5) Ensure your standing slightly wider than shoulder width with your toes pointed out slightly
Step 6) Take a deep breath and keep your torso straight
Step 7) Squat down (very slowly) keeping your chest up and your back straight
Step 8) Once your legs are just below parallel to the ground, exhale and squat up explosively (avoid locking out your knees)
Step 9) Repeat for 10 to 12 reps

Exercise 2. Barbell Hip Thrusts

Sets/reps: 3 sets of 10-12 reps
Rest time: 60 seconds
Barbell Hip Thrust Execution:

Step 1) Lye on the floor with a barbell over your hips

Step 2) Bend you knees whilst keeping your feet flat on the floor

Step 3) Push the barbell into your hips (so that the metal bar is resting on your hip bone)

Step 4) Squeeze the glutes and lift up (until you can’t extend the bar any further)

Important note: There are a lot of other people who do not thrust high enough which contributes to lower back pain.

Step 5) Lower slowly and come straight back up again until you’ve completed all 10-12 reps

Exercise 3. Barbell Bench Press

Sets/reps: 3 sets of 10-12 reps
Rest time: 60 seconds
Barbell Bench Press Execution:

Step 1) Set up your squat rack so that when you’re lying down on the bench, the bar is right in front of your eyes and your elbows are bent so that you can lift the bar off of the rack.

Step 2) Hold the barbell so that your elbows are 75 degrees in front of you and are flexed 90 degrees (meaning your forearm should be perpendicular to the ground).

Step 3) Ensure your feet are under your knees on opposite sides of the bench and arch your back for greater

Step 4) Keep your shoulder blades down and back with your chest up, and abbs tight

Step 5) Push the bar up and straighten your arms so that the bar is above your eyes still

Step 6) Slowly lower the barbell down to your chest (not your eyes) keeping your elbows in front of you at all times to prevent internal rotation of your acromioclavicular (AC) joint

Step 7) Lower slowly and come straight back up again until you’ve completed all 10-12 reps

Step 8) On your last rep, rack the bar by maintaining straight arms until you can safely feel it behind you. Then, and only then – lower the bar until it is racked.

Exercise 4. Barbell Bicep Curl

Sets/reps: 3 sets of 10-12 reps
Rest time: 60 seconds
Barbell Bicep Curl Execution:

Step 1) Grab a barbell and add enough weight so that you can just about perform twelve reps.

Step 2) Hold the barbell with your elbows by your side

Step 3) Curl the barbell by bending your elbows to 90 degrees

Step 4) Very slowly lower the barbell until you reach your starting position.

Step 5) Repeat for 10-12 reps

Exercise 5. One Arm High-Band Row

Sets/reps: 2 sets of 10-12 reps per arm
Rest time: 60 seconds
One Arm High-Band Row Execution:

Step 1) Attach a durable resistance band to something up high – such as a pull up bar (loop the band through itself to create a knot)

Step 2) Grab the band with one hand and stand 2 metres back until you feel a good tension

Step 3) Rotate the arm your holding the band in so that your thumb is facing up

Step 4) Pull the band to your side and try to pull it back behind your body like your rowing for greater range of motion

Step 5) Slowly return back to the starting position and repeat on the same arm for 10-12 reps

Exercise 6. Banded face pulls

Sets/reps: 2 sets of 10-12 reps per arm
Rest time: 60 seconds
Banded Face Pull Execution:

Step 1) Attach a durable resistance band to something up high – such as a pull up bar (loop the band through itself to create a knot)

Step 2) Step away slightly so that you have some tension on the band and ensure that you thumbs are pointing up

Step 3) Keeping your shoulder blades down and back, pull the band to either side of your ears (ensuring that your elbows are further in front of your hands)

Step 4) In this position, extend your arms up above you until they are straight (you’ll feel your lower traps really working here)

Step 5) Slowly lower the band back down to your ears and then slowly back in front of you

Step 6) Repeat this for 10-12 reps

Full Body Workout B

This is the second workout which you can do using a squat rack.
For this workout, you’ll need the same equipment you used in workout A.
These were:

  • Squat Rack
  • Barbell
  • Weighted plates
  • Resistance band

Here are the exercises:

  • Deadlifts (3 sets of 6 reps)
  • Barbell reverse lunge (3 sets of 10-12 reps)
  • Barbell overhead press (3 sets of 10-12 reps)
  • Barbell row (3 sets of 10-12 reps)
  • Back widow (2 sets of 10-12 reps)
  • Angels & Devils 60 seconds

Dynamic Warm-Up

Dynamic Warm-Up Execution:

Text transcript:

  • Inchworms (perform 10 in a row)
  • 90/90 stretches (5 on each side)
  • Rolling crucifix (5 on each side)
  • Table twists (5 on each side)
  • Three-way lunge and reach (5 on each leg)
  • Hamstring pulses (5 on each leg)
  • Hamstring reaches (5 on each leg)
  • Can openers (10 on each side)
  • Shoulder circles (10 on each side)
  • Ankle breakers (5 on each side)

Exercise 1. Deadlift

Sets/reps: 3 sets of 6 reps
Rest time: 60 seconds
Deadlift Execution:

Step 1) Stack a barbell with enough weight for you to do 6 reps safely

Step 2) Put the bar over your laces, and keep your chest up and lower down to the ground so that you back is slightly arched

Step 3) With your chest over your knees and your knees over your toes, hold the bar with an alternating grip

Step 4) Engage your lats and retract your shoulder blades so that they are down and back

Step 5) Push through your heels as opposed to trying to lift with your arms/back

Step 6) As you push your heels into the ground, steady the bar up your body

Step 7) Extend your knees and squeeze your glutes as you thrust at the top of the movement ( you arms should be locked out straight throughout the deadlift)

Step 8) On lowering, slowly hip hinge (by keeping legs slightly bent) until the bar reaches your knees

Step 9) Steadily bend your knees and lower the barbell down your body and repeat for 6 more reps

Note: I’d recommend filming yourself as you do the deadlift. Ask yourself:
Do the bar move up your body vertically? Is your back straight throughout the movement? Have you pushed through into full hip extension at the top?

Exercise 2. Reverse Barbell Lunge

Sets/reps: 3 sets of 10-12 reps
Rest time: 60 seconds
Reverse Barbell Lunge Execution:

Step 1) Stack a barbell with enough weight for you to do 10-12 reps safely

Step 2) Walk up to the squat rack and place the barbell on your shoulders and upper traps like you would for a back squat

Step 3) Walk back a few steps and keep your torso straight with your head looking forward

Step 4) With your feet parallel to one another and shoulder width apart, take a big step back (3-4 feet)

Step 5) Lunge down carefully, squeezing your core and glutes throughout

Step 6) Return back to the initial position and repeat on the opposite leg until you’ve completed 10-12 reps

Exercise 3. Barbell Overhead Press

Sets/reps: 3 sets of 10-12 reps
Rest time: 60 seconds
Barbell Overhead Press Execution:

Step 1) Set the squat rack just below shoulder height

Step 2) Attach enough weight to a barbell so that you can safely do 10-12 reps

Step 3) Unrack the barbell and place it above your chest with your elbows out in front of your body

Step 4) Squeeze your glutes and core (throughout the movement) and straighten your knees and hips

Step 5) Press the barbell up over head until full lockout at the top

Step 6) Slowly lower the barbell back down to your chest, looking ahead throughout the movement

Step 7) Repeat for 10-12 reps

Exercise 4. Barbell Row

Sets/reps: 3 sets of 10-12 reps
Rest time: 60 seconds
Barbell Row Execution:

Step 1) Set the squat rack up so that the bar is at knee height

Step 2) Add enough weight to fail in 10-12 rep range

Step 3) Place your hands over the bar, shoulder width apart

Step 4) Keeping your back straight and core tight, unrack the bar from the squat rack

Step 5) Bend over athletically so that your back remains straight and your knees are slightly bent

Step 6) Pull your shoulders back and down and then:

Step 7) Pull the bar towards your upper core (paying careful attention not to flare your elbows out)

Step 8) As you pull the bar up, imagine as though you are trying to break it in half turn it outwards in your hands. (Now, obviously the bar isn’t going to break but this is how you’re going to do a better job at engaging your lats)

Step 9) Squeeze the bar up at the top and try to pinch your shoulder blades together

Step 10) Hold a second up top and then lower back down

Step 11) Contract again and repeat the movement for 10-12 reps

Exercise 5. Back Widow

Sets/reps: 3 sets of 10-12 reps
Rest time: 60 seconds
Back Widow Execution:

Step 1) Lye down on the ground with your elbows 75 degrees in front of you like you do in a chest press

Step 2) Bend your knees and keep your feet flat on the ground

Step 3) Without engaging your core, push your elbows into the ground so that your upper back is lifted off of the ground

Step 4) Go as high as your range of motion allows and then slowly return back to the ground

Step 5) Repeat for 10-12 reps

Exercise 6. Angels & Devils

Sets/reps: Perform for 60 seconds X 2 Sets
Rest time: 60 seconds
Angels & Devils Execution:

Step 1) Lay face down on the ground in the superman position with your legs together and your hands outstretched in front of you

Step 2) Squeeze your glutes and core and as you do so, lift your upper torso/arms and legs off of the ground like you’re superman

Step 3) Remain in this position and bring your arms around like you’re doing the breast-stroke in the swimming pool

Step 4) Slowly internally rotator your shoulders (your arms should be by your out to your side at this point)

Step 5) Once internally rotated, bring your arms back behind your body to your glutes.

Step 6) Slowly follow the same path back to the starting position

Step 7) Try to maintain this position for sixty seconds and repeat this twice

Conclusion: The Bottom Line On Racks

There are a wide variety of Squat and Power racks to choose from when it comes to making an upgrade to your gym.

Squat racks and squat stands are without a doubt the best option for people looking to save on money and space.

If on the other hand you are not limited by any of those factors, do consider getting the bigger, more solid power rack, in which you can easily do a viable full-body workout like the one we showed you.

This piece of gym equipment was made for heavy-duty work.

Ultimately, you will develop a good-looking, functional physique, by getting better and stronger on the compound movements like bench press, squats, deadlifts, rack pulls, pull-ups and even a chin up.

Now, though strength training is important, recovery and stretching are just as important for a fully functional and flexible physique!

Check out our best picks for stretching exercises here

Over to you:

What have you learnt about either squat racks vs power racks?

Could it be the fact that power racks are safer for loading weight?

Or perhaps you’ve learnt how to perform a great full-body workout with the help of a power rack.

Either way, let me know by leaving a comment below!

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